The Current

How to succeed in high school, get into college

Senior+Janice+working+with+Career%2FCenter+Information+Coordinator+Kate+Heald+on+the+college+application+process.
Senior Janice working with Career/Center Information Coordinator Kate Heald on the college application process.

Senior Janice working with Career/Center Information Coordinator Kate Heald on the college application process.

Spencer Neill

Spencer Neill

Senior Janice working with Career/Center Information Coordinator Kate Heald on the college application process.

Janice Asabere

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If you want to be successful and make six figures a year, then you’re probably stressing about what you’re going to do at college, or eventually, you’re going to stress.

Now, I’m not enrolled in college yet, so I’m right there struggling with y’all. But I do have a few tips and tricks that’ll send you in the right direction.

Step one: Hang out with people who have the same vision as you. Most of your peers might have a fixed mindset and are focused on the things around them, instead of the things ahead of them. If your friends would rather go out for lunch or roam the hallways instead of going on college visits, then you already know what to do. Drop them because they’re playing games.

Step two: If you need help and you can’t get that from your parents, join ACES or College Tracks. Both groups will help you with things like brag sheets, college visits, FAFSA applications and everything else that you need to be college ready.

Step three: Make sure your college essay is as tough as it possibly can be because that’s the only personal aspect that colleges see. Your test scores and transcripts could be trash, but how you sell yourself on your essay could save you. I know a couple graduates who weren’t the best students, but still got into college because they knew how to brand themselves.

Step four: Only allow your college recommendations to be written by teachers who genuinely like you. If you can’t have a one-on-one conversation with your teacher, don’t have them writing anything for you because they don’t have your best interests.

Step five: Obviously apply to colleges that you’re passionate about and ones you know you can get into. When the time comes and you’re rejected by Harvard, you can’t blame anybody but yourself.

Step six: This is going to sound corny, but believe in yourself because who else will? It’s easy to overlook someone who’s insecure.

Remember, we’re going to be adults soon, therefore there’s no time to fool around.

 

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