Third annual MYP Fair continues tradition, showcases student talent

Sophomore+Andre+Tulloch+with+his+project
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Third annual MYP Fair continues tradition, showcases student talent

Sophomore Andre Tulloch with his project

Sophomore Andre Tulloch with his project

James Wu

Sophomore Andre Tulloch with his project

James Wu

James Wu

Sophomore Andre Tulloch with his project

Brennan Guilds

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Last Friday Watkins Mill hosted its third annual Middle Years Programme project fair. The event is an opportunity for Sophomores to showcase the work they did on their projects and to talk about something they are passionate about.

“We had 34 students that finished by the project fair which is seven more than last year, and we had 33 students participate at the fair,” MYP coordinator Wendy Farmer said. “But I think it was just the same level of interest.”

“I decided to do the MYP projects because I wanted to learn more about equine therapy, and it looks good on college applications,” sophomore Alexandra Aucoin said. Her project was a glimpse into the effects of equine therapy on autistic children.

Though there are many reasons for choosing to do the project, such as the brag sheet entry and the MYP diploma, there were many more reasons behind why the students chose to do their specific projects. These ranged from having a lifelong passion for their subject to just being curious about their topic.

“When I was a kid, my dad gave me a guitar,” sophomore Kevin Truong said. “I saw this project as an opportunity to finally learn how to play.” Truong’s project was learning the basics to playing the guitar. As for what he intends to do with his new skill, “I want to expand and learn many other instruments, probably the piano,” Truong added.

As for sophomore Nikolai Ignowski, his project theme stemmed from an interest in World War II and other assorted History Channel documentaries. “I was amazed by how complex both machines were separately,” Ignowski said.

For his project, Ignowski designed a submarine/aircraft carrier splice that uses nuclear energy to both provide oxygen and power to the vessel. Potentially allowing it to stay submerged almost indefinitely.

Although the project was already due, Farmer doesn’t have to turn the projects in to IB until March. This means that although the fair is over, students can still start and complete their projects before the turn in date if they are still seeking those sweet sweet bragging rights.

“We encourage [students who try to finish their projects after the fair but before the turn in date],” Farmer said.

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