Teachers marry high school and college sweethearts, proving relationships can last

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Teachers marry high school and college sweethearts, proving relationships can last

Science teacher Matt Johnson and his wife, Ashley, when they first met in college

Science teacher Matt Johnson and his wife, Ashley, when they first met in college

Science teacher Matt Johnson and his wife, Ashley, when they first met in college

Science teacher Matt Johnson and his wife, Ashley, when they first met in college

Taylor Dawson

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Most people believe that high school relationships don’t last, but several Watkins Mill staff members have proven them wrong. They are now married to their high school and college sweethearts.

“It’s true, if she can cook, you have to wife her,” football coach Michael Brown said. He knew his wife was the one when she made him a nice, home-cooked steak. “Communication and honesty [play] a big role in making relationships last,” Brown added.

Brown recommends going online and taking the “Five Love Languages” test to find out your partner’s love language. “Nine times out of ten, opposites end up attracting and people’s love languages are different,” Brown said. 

Brown believes in the saying, “If the love was meant to be, it will always find its way back.” He and his wife were apart for eight years, but eventually came back together and grew happier than ever. 

Science teacher Matt Johnson with his wife, Ashley, and their two sons

Science teacher Matthew Johnson knew his wife was the one after a week of knowing her.“The ability to have mutual trust, to be willing to share everything with your partner, and having them as a best friend is the key to making a relationship last,” Johnson said.

Johnson’s advice on high school relationships was to “break up,” although he later said that was a joke. “For a relationship to be healthy, you have to be committed to the person. If you have any doubt [about] not wanting this in your life… don’t waste time,” Johnson added. 

Johnson recommends making a list of qualities and traits you want in a significant other, and reflect on that list to see if you hit all those qualities. “If you don’t,” Johnson said, “How can you sit there and expect those qualities out of another person if you, yourself, can’t even possess those qualities?” 

On a 16-hour car ride home, English teacher Chris Smith started screaming out of his window

English teacher Chris Smith with his wife, Michelle, in 2008

how much he loves his wife. In that exact moment, he knew she was the one for him.

“Being open and honest with each other is the easiest way to make a relationship last,” Smith said. he has known his wife for 25 years and is glad to say their passion is still very strong. “Explore before you settle down. Find out what works best for you,” Smith added.

So if you think you have found the one, don’t wait to make a move. Life is too short to let them get away because “you’re just in high school.” 

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